The Black Sea

The 8 pictures just posted were taken during our Romania trip when we reached the Black sea at Constanta. We arrived late at night, after not wanting to stop for the night at a truck stop on the motorway yet again.

It wasn’t easy to find this little beach, in the dark, through a city, headed to what felt like a dead end, and we did take a wrong turn to the military testing/training ground next door. This all felt quite surreal in the middle of the night. Upon waking,  after a windy and rainy night, we noticed that to our left was a training and shooting ground with signs prohibiting photography, and to our right were factory buildings and oil refineries. But nestled in between was our small private beach.

We saw almost no one, all that was there was a caravan and a rusty old sea container. Along the beach and coastline were dotted a number of bunkers, mostly filled with rubbish now. The view, if you just looked straight ahead at the sea was lovely, the quality of light unmatched throughout our trip. At sun set and as the moon began to show, the beach took on a lunar character. The beach was filled with millions of tiny light coloured brittle shells. I have never known such fragile shells in such volume, the crunching sound beneath your feet was surprisingly loud. This meant the ‘sand’ looked very light grey, not like the surface of our earth, but like you would imagine the moon to be. 

The sea, the edge of the country, looking east, was a good place to end our trip. After spending a few days here wondering the beach, reading, chatting, we decided to head back west and begin our long journey home along the slow and winding roads of Romania.

A few photographs coming up of a trip to Romania we made back in October. I still have lots of rolls of film to develop and scan, but for now here are some pictures taken on my phone. 

It was a fascinating country to visit in so many ways, and a real eye opener to visit a country where communism ended relatively recently. 

I hope the country doesn’t lose its wilderness.

It’s a country that is everyones and no ones - Hungarian, Romanian, Saxon/German, with a colourful and in may ways tragic history.

jgcphotography:

Tony Ray Jones - Beauty Contest, Margate 1967
“my aim is to communicate something of the spirit and the mentality of the English, their habits and their way of life, the ironies that exist in the way they do things, partly through tradition and partly through the nature of their environment and mentality. I have tried to present some of these daily anachronisms in an honest and descriptive manner, the visual aspect being directed by the content. For me there is something very special and rather humorous about the ‘English way of life’ and I wish to record it from my particular point of view before it becomes more Americanised. We are at an important stage in our history, having in a sense just been reduced to an island or defrocked and, as De Gaulle remarked, left naked. Nudity is perhaps more revealing of personality than a heavily clothed figure”. Tony Ray Jones - Creative Camera October 1968
Interview with Tony Ray Jones at Americansuburbx.com

jgcphotography:

Tony Ray Jones - Beauty Contest, Margate 1967

“my aim is to communicate something of the spirit and the mentality of the English, their habits and their way of life, the ironies that exist in the way they do things, partly through tradition and partly through the nature of their environment and mentality. I have tried to present some of these daily anachronisms in an honest and descriptive manner, the visual aspect being directed by the content. For me there is something very special and rather humorous about the ‘English way of life’ and I wish to record it from my particular point of view before it becomes more Americanised. We are at an important stage in our history, having in a sense just been reduced to an island or defrocked and, as De Gaulle remarked, left naked. Nudity is perhaps more revealing of personality than a heavily clothed figure”. Tony Ray Jones - Creative Camera October 1968

Interview with Tony Ray Jones at Americansuburbx.com

Why use film?

From : http://stocklandmartelblog.com/2010/01/06/pro-photographers-who-still-use-film/


Pro photographers who still use film

It’s not often you see a professional photographer taking the time to formally survey his colleagues about an issue, but that’s just what San Diego–based shooter Robert Benson has done at his blog. Curious about professional photographers who still use film—he calls them “the holdouts”—he sent some questions to 11 shooters, including our own Jeff Lipsky.

I’ve posted an excerpt below, but if you have the time, it’s worth going here to read the whole thing.

Why do you shoot film?
Brian Finke: I almost exclusively shoot film, with the exception of recently starting to shoot video with the new Canon, and soon checking out the new Nikon HD camera.  More and more these days when I am on assignment I get the, WOW, reaction when I pull the first Polaroid and everyone on set sees I’m shooting film.  I am instantly seen as an art photographer, which makes by happy. I learned shooting film and love it.  I shoot exclusively with the Hasselblad, it is a great process, taking the Polaroids, loading all the backs, then while shooting taking a pause and reloading, the physicality of the camera and process are beautiful.  I also prefer the grain and depth of film and the chromogenic print, especially when viewed in a large scale, gallery environment.

Paolo Marchesi: I like the “organic” feel of film and the process.  When I shoot film is mostly large format and shooting large format makes you think about the shot more.  It makes you a better photographer.  With digital is easy to just fire away without really taking the time to take “the shot”.

Amanda Friedman: Film has better exposure latitude. Film does significantly better in low light, I get better blacks. I shot a ton of night photography and I’m still finding film to be a much better choice. I can shoot ISO 800 speed film and get beautiful results—can’t really do that with digital yet.

Simon Watson: Because it is beautiful, easy to use and it is always so much more sophisticated looking than digital. Always.

Finn O’Hara: I love the pace of shooting film, and the reality of the exposure is much more tangible when shooting film.

José Mandojana: A few reasons.  I like my medium format and large format film bodies and lenses better. I just see the frame better with these cameras vs. a digital SLR. I also shoot film because the color neg is perfect in my eyes. When shooting raw, a lot of tweaking needs to be done to get it to look like my film. It can be done, but film still has a richness unmatched by digital. Why mess with perfection?

Michael Sugrue: In addition to the look/feel of the image, I most like the workflow of shooting 4×5.  It’s a very quiet, studied approach.  A lot of the mental aspects of shooting large-format film are lost with the instantaneity of digital capture.

..

A recent portrait of actress Ellen Page by Jeff Lipsky.

..

Jeff Lipsky: Many reasons…… For one, I love shooting my film cameras. There is something special when shooting a portrait with my 4×5. I feel digital takes the pace and feel away. I still enjoy looking at a proof sheet with a good loupe. The editing process is easier and more tangible. Digital format has yet to reach the 6×7 format.  Film is more forgiving and has more range. I can flare and backlight images and still have information in the negative. Digitally it would be lost. I actually like being the first person to see and edit my film. To many times there is a crowd of people surrounding the monitor, no matter how hard I try to hide it. I love working with 120 films. Changing a film back or reloading enables me to change things up and get more variations.  Believe it or not, it’s still more economical for most editorial jobs.

David Lauridsen: Film is beautiful. It has a depth to it and a painterly quality in the way it captures light and texture that digital just isn’t capable of capturing… yet. I shoot a lot of travel photography and like strong side light and backlight, which I think is the biggest weakness of digital. With film, I can expose for good shadow detail and just burn in the sky. With digital, the sky is just gone completely or if I expose for it then I end up with an image that is just much darker than I like. It’s recoverable to some degree in post, but it still doesn’t have that “lushness” that film has.

Bryce Duffy: I still really love the aesthetic of film. I’m not saying it’s not possible to get very similar results with digital, it’s just that in 20 years of working with film stock and polaroid, and a long standing relationship with a lab, there’s so much that is going in to achieving the aesthetic that I’m after, and other peoples expertise as well. Switching to digital means that so much more of that falls back on the photographer. In a way you’re your own film manufacturer, your own lab, your own printer. And I still really feel that there are certain lighting situations where film just “feels” more organic and digital can not replicate that as far as I’ve seen.

guardian:

Morning Tumblr! Today we’re celebrating World autism awareness day with our Monday morning post. In the last two decades there has been a steady increase in the prevalence of autism globally. Some people talk of it as an epidemic, with statistics estimating as many as one in 100 people are affected. We have a series of photographs are of students at the MacIntyre residential school in Wingrave, Buckinghamshire, for young people with severe learning disabilities, including autism. Reblog to make more people aware of autism. 

guardian:

Morning Tumblr! Today we’re celebrating World autism awareness day with our Monday morning post. In the last two decades there has been a steady increase in the prevalence of autism globally. Some people talk of it as an epidemic, with statistics estimating as many as one in 100 people are affected. We have a series of photographs are of students at the MacIntyre residential school in Wingrave, Buckinghamshire, for young people with severe learning disabilities, including autism. Reblog to make more people aware of autism. 

(Source: , via coraliedatta)

The start of my constructed image project. My partners Grandad collected masses of stamps over his life time. although many were catalogued and sold, there still remain quite a volume that are unsorted. So in order to go some way towards creating a sort of alternative portrait of him I am photographing the residual stamps. he collected in chaotic way, and the stamps I am working with are all in a gigantic plastic bag which I brought up from the cellar. The aim to to be playful and create an archiving system that goes against how collectors/archivists would normally work. So I will create a ‘silly’ system whereby I will group stamps perhaps according to gender (man or woman in the image), colour etc etc.  This will culminate in a series of images, eclectic in nature and random in their order, creating a sort of order from complete chaos. I will keep things up dated on here as a when I can. 

The start of my constructed image project. My partners Grandad collected masses of stamps over his life time. although many were catalogued and sold, there still remain quite a volume that are unsorted. So in order to go some way towards creating a sort of alternative portrait of him I am photographing the residual stamps. he collected in chaotic way, and the stamps I am working with are all in a gigantic plastic bag which I brought up from the cellar. The aim to to be playful and create an archiving system that goes against how collectors/archivists would normally work. So I will create a ‘silly’ system whereby I will group stamps perhaps according to gender (man or woman in the image), colour etc etc.  This will culminate in a series of images, eclectic in nature and random in their order, creating a sort of order from complete chaos. I will keep things up dated on here as a when I can. 

Camera Obscura

So today I am creating a camera obscura in my room, which has unusually large windows. I have bought some rubble sacks and gaffa tape from B&Q, and I’m slowly in the process of basically turning my room into a camera. It is an impossibly beautiful day outside and it feels completely odd to be purposefully blocking out the light so thoroughly! So I now have to try and work out focal length in relation to the aperture I make in the window to ensure I can make an accurate light reading. I am glad that my light meter also goes down to tiny iso’s, I think colour paper has an iso of around 6 but will need to double check this. Anyway watch this space, I should be able to process the prints during the week and will endeavour to pop some of the results on here in due course. Enjoy the sunshine!